Access Control

ACCESS CONTROL

Access control refers to security features that control who can access resources in the operating system. Applications call access control functions to set who can access specific resources or control access to resources provided by the application.
This overview describes the security model for controlling access to Windows objects, such as files, and for controlling access to administrative functions, such as setting the system time or auditing user actions. The Access Control Model topic provides a high-level description of the parts of access control and how they interact with each other.
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In computer security, general access control includes authorization, authentication, access approval, and audit. A more narrow definition of access control would cover only access approval, whereby the system makes a decision to grant or reject an access request from an already authenticated subject, based on what the subject is authorized to access. Authentication and access control are often combined into a single operation, so that access is approved based on successful authentication, or based on an anonymous access token. Authentication methods and tokens include passwords, biometric scans, physical keys, electronic keys and devices, hidden paths, social barriers, and monitoring by humans and automated systems.[citation needed]

In any access-control model, the entities that can perform actions on the system are called subjects, and the entities representing resources to which access may need to be controlled are called objects (see also Access Control Matrix). Subjects and objects should both be considered as software entities, rather than as human users: any human users can only have an effect on the system via the software entities that they control.[citation needed]

Although some systems equate subjects with user IDs, so that all processes started by a user by default have the same authority, this level of control is not fine-grained enough to satisfy the principle of least privilege, and arguably is responsible for the prevalence of malware in such systems (see computer insecurity).[citation needed]

In some models, for example the object-capability model, any software entity can potentially act as both subject and object

access control is the selective restriction of access to a place or other resource.[1] The act of accessing may mean consuming, entering, or using. Permission to access a resource is called authorization.Locks and login credentials are two analogous mechanisms of access control.